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Food Chem. 2011 Dec 1;129(3):1126-31. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2011.05.090. Epub 2011 May 25.

Levels of Se, Zn, Mg and Ca in commercial goat and cow milk fermented products: Relationship with their chemical composition and probiotic starter culture.

Author information

1
Dpto. de Nutrición y Bromatología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Cartuja, C.P. 18012 Granada, Spain.
2
Dpto. de Nutrición y Bromatología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Cartuja, C.P. 18012 Granada, Spain. Electronic address: mdruiz@ugr.es.

Abstract

We determined Se, Zn, Mg and Ca levels in 42 samples of goat and cow fermented milks which are widely consumed in Spain were determined. Atomic absorption spectrometry (hydride generation for Se and flame atomisation for remaining elements) was used as an analytical technique. Reliability of the procedure was checked. Only Mg levels in goat fermented milks were significantly higher to those found in cow fermented milks (p<0.022). Important similarities in concentrations and behaviours for Mg and Ca have been observed. Mg contents were significantly correlated with Zn (r=0.590; p<0.001) and Ca (r=0.344; p<0.028) concentrations, Zn, Mg and Ca levels with protein content (r=0.554, r=0.479, r=0.388, respectively), Mg levels with fats (r=0.403; p=0.011) and Se levels with carbohydrates (r=-0.379; p=0.031). Mineral and macronutrient levels in yogurts with traditional probiotic starter cultures were not significantly different to those found in fermented milks with additional probiotic microorganisms (p>0.05). It was concluded that goat fermented milks are a better source for Mg than cow samples.

KEYWORDS:

Calcium; Chemical composition; Goat and cow fermented dairy products; Magnesium; Probiotic starter culture; Selenium; Zinc

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