Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2015 Jan;31(1):48-51. doi: 10.3109/09513590.2014.958990. Epub 2014 Sep 11.

Polycystic ovary syndrome and chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas (UNICAMP) , Campinas, São Paulo , Brazil and.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has been associated with an autoimmune origin, either per se or favoring the onset of autoimmune diseases, from a stimulatory action on the inflammatory response. Thus, autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) could be more prevalent among women with PCOS.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the prevalence of AIT in women with PCOS.

STUDY DESIGN:

It was a cross-sectional study, in a tertiary center, including 65 women with PCOS and 65 women without this condition. Clinical and laboratory parameters were evaluated and a thyroid ultrasound scan was performed. Levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibodies, anti-thyroglobulin (anti-TG) antibodies, and thyroid ultrasound findings were evaluated.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) in women with PCOS was 16.9% and 6.2% in the non-PCOS group. AIT was more common in the PCOS group compared with the non-PCOS group (43.1% versus 26.2%). But, when it was adjusted by weight and insulin resistance, the difference in the thyroiditis risk was not observed (OR 0.78, CI 0.28-2.16).

CONCLUSION:

AIT risk was similar in the PCOS and the non-PCOS group. SCH are more common in women with PCOS, highlighting a need for periodic monitoring of thyroid function.

KEYWORDS:

Anti-thyroid peroxidase; anti-thyroglobulin; autoimmune thyroiditis; polycystic ovary syndrome; subclinical hypothyroidism

PMID:
25211537
DOI:
10.3109/09513590.2014.958990
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center