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Neuroradiology. 2014 Dec;56(12):1031-8. doi: 10.1007/s00234-014-1426-z. Epub 2014 Sep 10.

Discrimination between glioma grades II and III in suspected low-grade gliomas using dynamic contrast-enhanced and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MR imaging: a histogram analysis approach.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Radiology, Uppsala University, BFC Akademiska sjukhuset, SE 751 85, Uppsala, Sweden, aka03nfa@gmail.com.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used in the pre-operative assessment of brain tumours. The aim of this prospective study was to identify the perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion imaging that could best discriminate between grade II and III gliomas.

METHODS:

MRI (3 T) including morphological ((T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T1-weighted (T1W)+Gd)) and perfusion (DCE and DSC) sequences was performed in 39 patients with newly diagnosed suspected low-grade glioma after written informed consent in this review board-approved study. Regions of interests (ROIs) in tumour area were delineated on FLAIR images co-registered to DCE and DSC, respectively, in 25 patients with histopathological grade II (n = 18) and III (n = 7) gliomas. Statistical analysis of differences between grade II and grade III gliomas in histogram perfusion parameters was performed, and the areas under the curves (AUC) from the ROC analyses were evaluated.

RESULTS:

In DCE, the skewness of transfer constant (k(trans)) was found superior for differentiating grade II from grade III in all gliomas (AUC 0.76). In DSC, the standard deviation of relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was found superior for differentiating grade II from grade III gliomas (AUC 0.80).

CONCLUSIONS:

Histogram parameters from k(trans) (DCE) and rCBF (DSC) could most efficiently discriminate between grade II and grade III gliomas.

PMID:
25204450
DOI:
10.1007/s00234-014-1426-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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