Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Food Prot. 2014 Aug;77(8):1394-401. doi: 10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-13-510.

Characterization of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from shrimps and their environment.

Author information

1
Division of Global Epidemiology, Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
2
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
3
Division of Global Epidemiology, Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan. orasa.sut@mahidol.ac.th.
4
Division of Global Epidemiology, Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan. suzuki@czc.hokudai.ac.jp.

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria associated with food and water is a global concern. To survey the risk, 312 Escherichia coli isolates from shrimp farms and markets in Thailand were examined for susceptibility to 10 antimicrobials. The results showed that 17.6% of isolates (55 of 312) were resistant to at least one of the tested drugs, and high resistance rates were observed to tetracycline (14.4%; 45 of 312), ampicillin (8.0%; 25 of 312), and trimethroprim (6.7%; 21 of 312); 29.1% (16 of 55) were multidrug resistant. PCR assay of the tet (A), tet (B), tet (C), tet (D), tet (E), and tet (G) genes detected one or more of these genes in 47 of the 55 resistant isolates. Among these genes, tet (A) (69.1%; 38 of 55) was the most common followed by tet (B) (56.4%; 31 of 55) and tet (C) (3.6%; 2 of 55). The resistant isolates were further investigated for class 1 integrons. Of the 55 resistant isolates, 16 carried class 1 integrons and 7 carried gene cassettes encoding trimethoprim resistance (dfrA12 or dfrA17) and aminoglycosides resistance (aadA2 or aadA5). Two class 1 integrons, In54 (dfrA17-aadA5) and In27 (dfrA12-orfF-aadA2), were found in four and three isolates, respectively. These results indicate a risk of drug-resistant E. coli contamination in shrimp farms and selling places. The occurrence of multidrug-resistant E. coli carrying tet genes and class 1 integrons indicates an urgent need to monitor the emergence of drug-resistant E. coli to control the dissemination of drug-resistant strains and the further spread of resistance genes to other pathogenic bacteria.

PMID:
25198603
DOI:
10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-13-510
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center