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Nat Rev Microbiol. 2014 Oct;12(10):661-72. doi: 10.1038/nrmicro3344. Epub 2014 Sep 8.

The gut microbiota, bacterial metabolites and colorectal cancer.

Author information

1
Microbiology Group, Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Aberdeen, Greenburn Road, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB21 9SB, UK.
2
Gastrointestinal Research Group, Division of Applied Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD, UK.

Abstract

Accumulating evidence suggests that the human intestinal microbiota contributes to the aetiology of colorectal cancer (CRC), not only via the pro-carcinogenic activities of specific pathogens but also via the influence of the wider microbial community, particularly its metabolome. Recent data have shown that the short-chain fatty acids acetate, propionate and butyrate function in the suppression of inflammation and cancer, whereas other microbial metabolites, such as secondary bile acids, promote carcinogenesis. In this Review, we discuss the relationship between diet, microbial metabolism and CRC and argue that the cumulative effects of microbial metabolites should be considered in order to better predict and prevent cancer progression.

PMID:
25198138
DOI:
10.1038/nrmicro3344
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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