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Sleep. 2014 Oct 1;37(10):1589-600. doi: 10.5665/sleep.4064.

Blood-gene expression reveals reduced circadian rhythmicity in individuals resistant to sleep deprivation.

Author information

1
Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology and Division of Sleep Medicine/Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA and Department of Respiratory Medicine and Sleep, Landspitali - The National University Hospital, Iceland and Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Iceland.
2
Department of Exploratory and Translational Sciences, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA.
3
Biostatistics Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC.
4
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Iceland.
5
Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology and Division of Sleep Medicine/Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA and.
6
Neuroscience Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA.
7
Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology and Division of Sleep Medicine/Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To address whether changes in gene expression in blood cells with sleep loss are different in individuals resistant and sensitive to sleep deprivation.

DESIGN:

Blood draws every 4 h during a 3-day study: 24-h normal baseline, 38 h of continuous wakefulness and subsequent recovery sleep, for a total of 19 time-points per subject, with every 2-h psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) assessment when awake.

SETTING:

Sleep laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS:

Fourteen subjects who were previously identified as behaviorally resistant (n = 7) or sensitive (n = 7) to sleep deprivation by PVT.

INTERVENTION:

Thirty-eight hours of continuous wakefulness.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

We found 4,481 unique genes with a significant 24-h diurnal rhythm during a normal sleep-wake cycle in blood (false discovery rate [FDR] < 5%). Biological pathways were enriched for biosynthetic processes during sleep. After accounting for circadian effects, two genes (SREBF1 and CPT1A, both involved in lipid metabolism) exhibited small, but significant, linear changes in expression with the duration of sleep deprivation (FDR < 5%). The main change with sleep deprivation was a reduction in the amplitude of the diurnal rhythm of expression of normally cycling probe sets. This reduction was noticeably higher in behaviorally resistant subjects than sensitive subjects, at any given P value. Furthermore, blood cell type enrichment analysis showed that the expression pattern difference between sensitive and resistant subjects is mainly found in cells of myeloid origin, such as monocytes.

CONCLUSION:

Individual differences in behavioral effects of sleep deprivation are associated with differences in diurnal amplitude of gene expression for genes that show circadian rhythmicity.

KEYWORDS:

circadian rhythm; gene expression; microarray analysis; psychomotor vigilance test; sleep deprivation

PMID:
25197809
PMCID:
PMC4173916
DOI:
10.5665/sleep.4064
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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