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Expert Opin Drug Saf. 2014 Oct;13(10):1319-26. doi: 10.1517/14740338.2014.947262. Epub 2014 Sep 6.

Psychotropic drugs and bruxism.

Author information

1
University of L'Aquila, School of Dentistry, Department of Life, Health, and Environmental Sciences , Piazzale Salvatore Tommasi 1, 67100 Coppito (AQ), L'Aquila , Italy +39 0862433202 ; +39 08624332 ; g.falisi@tiscali.it.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Sleep and awake bruxism is defined as 'a parafunctional activity including clenching, bracing, gnashing, and grinding of the teeth'. Some evidence suggests that bruxism may be caused by, or associated with, alterations in the CNS neurotransmission. Several classes of psychotropic drugs interfering with CNS activity may potentially contribute to bruxism. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine relevant peer-reviewed papers to identify and describe the various classes of psychotropic substances that may cause, exacerbate or reduce bruxism as the result of their pharmacological action in CNS neurons.

AREAS COVERED:

A literature search from 1980 to the present was performed using PubMed database. The term 'bruxism' was used in association with 'psychotropic', 'dopamine (DA)', 'serotonin', 'histamine', 'antipsychotics', 'antidepressants', 'antihistaminergics' and 'stimulants'.

EXPERT OPINION:

Studies on the effects of DA agonists (Levo-DOPA, psychostimulants) and antagonists (antipsychotics) identified a central role of DA in the pathogenesis of pharmacologically induced bruxism. Important information from studies on drugs acting on serotonin neurotransmission (antidepressants) was recognized. Other mechanisms involving different neurotransmitters are emerging. This is the case of antihistaminergic drugs which may induce bruxism as a consequence of their disinhibitory effect on the serotonergic system.

KEYWORDS:

antipsychotic; bruxism; dopamine; psychotropic drugs; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor; serotonin

PMID:
25195948
DOI:
10.1517/14740338.2014.947262
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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