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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 Dec;23(12):2716-36. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0207. Epub 2014 Sep 5.

Childhood brain tumor epidemiology: a brain tumor epidemiology consortium review.

Author information

1
Brown School Masters of Public Health Program, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri.
2
American Childhood Cancer Organization, Kensington, Maryland.
3
Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio.
4
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Carrer Doctor Aiguader, Barcelona, Spain. Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Plaça de la Mercè, Barcelona, Spain. CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, Carrer Casanova, Barcelona, Spain.
5
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Carrer Doctor Aiguader, Barcelona, Spain. Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Plaça de la Mercè, Barcelona, Spain. CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, Carrer Casanova, Barcelona, Spain. McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
6
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California.
7
Division of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
9
Division of Neurology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. scheurer@bcm.edu.

Abstract

Childhood brain tumors are the most common pediatric solid tumor and include several histologic subtypes. Although progress has been made in improving survival rates for some subtypes, understanding of risk factors for childhood brain tumors remains limited to a few genetic syndromes and ionizing radiation to the head and neck. In this report, we review descriptive and analytical epidemiology childhood brain tumor studies from the past decade and highlight priority areas for future epidemiology investigations and methodological work that is needed to advance our understanding of childhood brain tumor causes. Specifically, we summarize the results of a review of studies published since 2004 that have analyzed incidence and survival in different international regions and that have examined potential genetic, immune system, developmental and birth characteristics, and environmental risk factors. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 23(12); 2716-36.

PMID:
25192704
PMCID:
PMC4257885
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0207
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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