Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nutr Res. 2014 Dec;34(12):1058-65. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2014.07.017. Epub 2014 Aug 1.

No significant independent relationships with cardiometabolic biomarkers were detected in the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study population.

Author information

1
Centre de Recherche Public de la Santé, Centre d'Etudes en Santé, Grand-Duché de Luxembourg, Strassen L-1445, Luxembourg. Electronic address: alaa.alkerwi@crp-sante.lu.
2
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. Electronic address: shivappa@email.sc.edu.
3
Centre de Recherche Public de la Santé, Centre d'Etudes en Santé, Grand-Duché de Luxembourg, Strassen L-1445, Luxembourg; Nutritional Physiology Research Centre, School of Health Sciences BJ2-36, University of South Australia, City East Campus, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address: georgina.crichton@crp-sante.lu.
4
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. Electronic address: JHEBERT@mailbox.sc.edu.

Abstract

Recently, there has been an influx of research interest regarding the anti-inflammatory role that diet has in chronic and metabolic diseases. A literature-based dietary inflammatory index (DII) that can be used to characterize the inflammation-modulating capacity of individuals' diets has even been developed and validated in an American population. We hypothesized that the DII could predict levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), which is an important inflammatory marker, as well as metabolic measures that include the metabolic syndrome and its components in European adults. This hypothesis was tested according to data from 1352 participants from the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study, a nationwide, cross-sectional survey based in Luxembourg. Statistical methods consisted of descriptive and multivariable logistic regression analyses. The DII ranged from a minimum of -4.02 (most anti-inflammatory) to a maximum of 4.00 points, with a mean value of -0.41. Participants with higher DII score were significantly younger and had lower body mass index, waist circumferences, and systolic blood pressure levels. Other cardiovascular biomarkers including diastolic blood pressure, CRP, lipids, and glycemic biomarkers did not vary significantly across DII tertiles. Participants with proinflammatory (>1) DII scores had increased adjusted odds (odds ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-2.13) of having a low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, compared with those with anti-inflammatory scores (DII ≤1). There were no significant relationships between high-sensitivity CRP and the DII. This study, which tested the inflammatory capacity of the DII outside the United States, did not detect a significant independent relationship with cardiometabolic biomarkers, by using Food Frequency Questionnaire-collected data. These results are informative and representative of a relevant step in directing future research for nutrition and diet quality.

KEYWORDS:

Cross-sectional study; Human; Inflammation; Metabolic syndrome; Nutritional assessment; Nutritional index; Population-based

PMID:
25190219
PMCID:
PMC4329249
DOI:
10.1016/j.nutres.2014.07.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center