Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2014 Oct;22(5):388-93. doi: 10.1097/MOO.0000000000000079.

Noise-induced hearing loss: an occupational medicine perspective.

Author information

1
aMichigan Ear Institute, Farmington Hills bDepartment of Otolaryngology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Up to 30 million workers in the United States are exposed to potentially detrimental levels of noise. Although reliable medications for minimizing or reversing noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) are not currently available, NIHL is entirely preventable. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology and pathophysiology of occupational NIHL. We will focus on at-risk populations and discuss prevention programs. Current prevention programs focus on reducing inner ear damage by minimizing environmental noise production and through the use of personal hearing protective devices.

RECENT FINDINGS:

NIHL is the result of a complex interaction between environmental factors and patient factors, both genetic and acquired. The effects of noise exposure are specific to an individual. Trials are currently underway evaluating the role of antioxidants in protection from, and even reversal of, NIHL.

SUMMARY:

Occupational NIHL is the most prevalent occupational disease in the United States. Occupational noise exposures may contribute to temporary or permanent threshold shifts, although even temporary threshold shifts may predispose an individual to eventual permanent hearing loss. Noise prevention programs are paramount in reducing hearing loss as a result of occupational exposures.

PMID:
25188429
DOI:
10.1097/MOO.0000000000000079
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center