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Nicotine Tob Res. 2015 May;17(5):539-45. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntu171. Epub 2014 Sep 3.

The influence of physical activity on cigarette smoking among adolescents: evidence from Add Health.

Author information

1
Analysis and Services Research Branch, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockville, MD;
2
Department of Economics, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH;
3
Department of Economics, Campbell School of Business, Berry College, Mount Berry, GA lheller@berry.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

This article explored the relationship between physical activity and smoking behavior among adolescents using rich longitudinal survey data from a nationally representative sample of adolescents.

METHODS:

Several endogeneity-corrected models were estimated to ascertain the effect of exercise on both the probability of being a smoker and the intensity of cigarette smoking.

RESULTS:

The analysis indicated that 1 additional weekly occurrence of exercise led to a 0.3% decline in the probability of being a smoker and led to a 4.1% reduction in the number of cigarettes smoked by a smoker during a month, a result that was robust to stratification by gender and race/ethnicity. Consistent with the national guidelines, frequencies of physical activity of at least 7 times per week appeared to exhibit the biggest benefits in terms of reduction in smoking for both genders and across races/ethnicities.

CONCLUSIONS:

Reduction in health-damaging smoking behavior among adolescents could be an additional benefit of being physically active. This research documented a new pathway by which even moderate increases in physical activity could result in improved health outcomes by reducing smoking.

PMID:
25187062
DOI:
10.1093/ntr/ntu171
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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