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Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2014 Sep 4;12:114. doi: 10.1186/s12955-014-0114-3.

Impact of Alzheimer's Disease on Caregiver Questionnaire: internal consistency, convergent validity, and test-retest reliability of a new measure for assessing caregiver burden.

Author information

1
Covance Market Access Services Inc, 10300 Campus Point Drive, Suite 225, San Diego, CA, 92121, USA. jason.cole@covance.com.
2
Current address: Pharmaceutical Product Development, 9330 Scranton Road, Suite 200, San Diego, CA, 92121, USA. jason.cole@covance.com.
3
Baxter Healthcare Corporation, One Baxter Way, Westlake Village, CA, 91362, USA. diane_ito@baxter.com.
4
Covance Market Access Services Inc, 9801 Washingtonian Blvd., 9th Floor, Gaithersburg, MD, 20878, USA. yaozhu.chen@covance.com.
5
Covance Market Access Services Inc, 10300 Campus Point Drive, Suite 225, San Diego, CA, 92121, USA. rebecca.cheng@covance.com.
6
Covance Market Access Services Inc, 9801 Washingtonian Blvd., 9th Floor, Gaithersburg, MD, 20878, USA. jennifer.bolognese@covance.com.
7
Baxter Healthcare Corporation, One Baxter Way, Westlake Village, CA, 91362, USA. josephine_limcleod@baxter.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a lack of validated instruments to measure the level of burden of Alzheimer's disease (AD) on caregivers. The Impact of Alzheimer's Disease on Caregiver Questionnaire (IADCQ) is a 12-item instrument with a seven-day recall period that measures AD caregiver's burden across emotional, physical, social, financial, sleep, and time aspects. Primary objectives of this study were to evaluate psychometric properties of IADCQ administered on the Web and to determine most appropriate scoring algorithm.

METHODS:

A national sample of 200 unpaid AD caregivers participated in this study by completing the Web-based version of IADCQ and Short Form-12 Health Survey Version 2 (SF-12v2™). The SF-12v2 was used to measure convergent validity of IADCQ scores and to provide an understanding of the overall health-related quality of life of sampled AD caregivers. The IADCQ survey was also completed four weeks later by a randomly selected subgroup of 50 participants to assess test-retest reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was implemented to test the dimensionality of the IADCQ items. Classical item-level and scale-level psychometric analyses were conducted to estimate psychometric characteristics of the instrument. Test-retest reliability was performed to evaluate the instrument's stability and consistency over time.

RESULTS:

Virtually none (2%) of the respondents had either floor or ceiling effects, indicating the IADCQ covers an ideal range of burden. A single-factor model obtained appropriate goodness of fit and provided evidence that a simple sum score of the 12 items of IADCQ can be used to measure AD caregiver's burden. Scales-level reliability was supported with a coefficient alpha of 0.93 and an intra-class correlation coefficient (for test-retest reliability) of 0.68 (95% CI: 0.50-0.80). Low-moderate negative correlations were observed between the IADCQ and scales of the SF-12v2.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study findings suggest the IADCQ has appropriate psychometric characteristics as a unidimensional, Web-based measure of AD caregiver burden and is supported by strong model fit statistics from CFA, high degree of item-level reliability, good internal consistency, moderate test-retest reliability, and moderate convergent validity. Additional validation of the IADCQ is warranted to ensure invariance between the paper-based and Web-based administration and to determine an appropriate responder definition.

PMID:
25186634
PMCID:
PMC4265347
DOI:
10.1186/s12955-014-0114-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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