Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Pharmacother. 2014 Dec;48(12):1629-35. doi: 10.1177/1060028014549799. Epub 2014 Sep 3.

Vedolizumab: an α4β7 integrin inhibitor for inflammatory bowel diseases.

Author information

1
University of the Sciences, Philadelphia, PA, USA mic.smith@usciences.edu.
2
University of Michigan College of Pharmacy, University of Michigan Health Systems, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To review the pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of vedolizumab in the treatment of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD).

DATA SOURCES:

A literature search through clinicialtrials.gov, EMBASE and MEDLINE was conducted (January 1966-June 2014) using the terms vedolizumab and MLN0002. References from retrieved articles were reviewed for any additional material. Additionally, the prescribing information was retrieved.

STUDY SELECTION/DATA EXTRACTION:

Phase 1, 2, and 3 human and animal studies describing the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of vedolizumab were identified.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

Vedolizumab, an α4β7 integrin inhibitor, was recently approved for adult patients with moderate to severe active UC or CD who are refractory or intolerant to standard therapies or who are dependent on corticosteroids. Trial data have demonstrated that vedolizumab 300 mg at weeks 0, 2, and 6 followed by every 8 weeks is effective at inducing and maintaining clinical response and remission, improving mucosal appearance, and achieving corticosteroid-free remission in patients with UC. This regimen is also effective at achieving clinical response, remission, and corticosteroid-free remission in patients with CD. Patients treated with vedolizumab, unadjusted for exposure, reported experiencing nasopharyngitis, headache, nausea, arthralgias, pyrexia, upper-respiratory-tract infections, fatigue, and cough.

CONCLUSIONS:

Vedolizumab is an effective agent at inducing and maintaining remission in patients with UC or CD. Vedolizumab is generally well tolerated and has not been associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

KEYWORDS:

Crohn’s disease; ulcerative colitis; vedolizumab

PMID:
25186623
DOI:
10.1177/1060028014549799
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center