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Nat Commun. 2014 Sep 3;5:4724. doi: 10.1038/ncomms5724.

Microbial genomic analysis reveals the essential role of inflammation in bacteria-induced colorectal cancer.

Author information

1
1] Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27713, USA [2].
2
1] Department of Bioinformatics and Genomics, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223, USA [2] Bioinformatics Services Division, Department of Bioinformatics and Genomics, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Kannapolis, North Carolina 28081, USA [3].
3
Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27713, USA.
4
1] Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27713, USA [2] Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA.
5
Department of Bioinformatics and Genomics, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina 28223, USA.
6
1] Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA [2] Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA.

Abstract

Enterobacteria, especially Escherichia coli, are abundant in patients with inflammatory bowel disease or colorectal cancer (CRC). However, it is unclear whether cancer is promoted by inflammation-induced expansion of E. coli and/or changes in expression of specific microbial genes. Here we use longitudinal (2, 12 and 20 weeks) 16S rRNA sequencing of luminal microbiota from ex-germ-free mice to show that inflamed Il10(-/-) mice maintain a higher abundance of Enterobacteriaceae than healthy wild-type mice. Experiments with mono-colonized Il10(-/-) mice reveal that host inflammation is necessary for E. coli cancer-promoting activity. RNA-sequence analysis indicates significant changes in E. coli gene catalogue in Il10(-/-) mice, with changes mostly driven by adaptation to the intestinal environment. Expression of specific genes present in the tumour-promoting E. coli pks island are modulated by inflammation/CRC development. Thus, progression of inflammation in Il10(-/-) mice supports Enterobacteriaceae and alters a small subset of microbial genes important for tumour development.

PMID:
25182170
PMCID:
PMC4155410
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms5724
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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