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Adv Immunol. 2014;124:67-94. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-800147-9.00003-0.

How immunoglobulin G antibodies kill target cells: revisiting an old paradigm.

Author information

1
Institute of Genetics, Department of Biology, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
2
Institute of Genetics, Department of Biology, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address: falk.nimmerjahn@fau.de.

Abstract

The capacity of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to eliminate virtually any target cell has resulted in the widespread introduction of cytotoxic antibodies into the clinic in settings of cancer therapy, autoimmunity, and transplantation, for example. More recently, it has become apparent that also the protection from viral infection via IgG antibodies may require cytotoxic effector functions, suggesting that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) directed against malignant or virally infected cells is one of the most essential effector mechanisms triggered by IgG antibodies to protect the host. A detailed understanding of the underlying molecular and cellular pathways is critical, therefore, to make full use of this antibody effector function. Several studies over the last years have provided novel insights into the effector pathways and innate immune effector cells responsible for ADCC reactions. One of the most notable outcomes of many of these reports is that cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system rather than natural killer cells are critical for removal of IgG opsonized target cells in vivo.

KEYWORDS:

ADCC; ADCP; Fc-receptor; Immunoglobulin G; Natural killer cell

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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