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J Proteomics. 2015 Jan 1;112:83-94. doi: 10.1016/j.jprot.2014.08.010. Epub 2014 Aug 28.

Proteomic and metabolomic responses of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to elevated pCO2 exposure.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environmental Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research (YIC), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environmental Processes, YICCAS, Yantai 264003, PR China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, PR China.
2
Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environmental Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research (YIC), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environmental Processes, YICCAS, Yantai 264003, PR China.
3
Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environmental Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research (YIC), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environmental Processes, YICCAS, Yantai 264003, PR China. Electronic address: hfwu@yic.ac.cn.
4
Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environmental Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research (YIC), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environmental Processes, YICCAS, Yantai 264003, PR China. Electronic address: jmzhao@yic.ac.cn.

Abstract

The gradually increased atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) has thrown the carbonate chemistry off balance and resulted in decreased seawater pH in marine ecosystem, termed ocean acidification (OA). Anthropogenic OA is postulated to affect the physiology of many marine calcifying organisms. However, the susceptibility and metabolic pathways of change in most calcifying animals are still far from being well understood. In this work, the effects of exposure to elevated pCO2 were characterized in gills and hepatopancreas of Crassostrea gigas using integrated proteomic and metabolomic approaches. Metabolic responses indicated that high CO2 exposure mainly caused disturbances in energy metabolism and osmotic regulation marked by differentially altered ATP, glucose, glycogen, amino acids and organic osmolytes in oysters, and the depletions of ATP in gills and the accumulations of ATP, glucose and glycogen in hepatopancreas accounted for the difference in energy distribution between these two tissues. Proteomic responses suggested that OA could not only affect energy and primary metabolisms, stress responses and calcium homeostasis in both tissues, but also influence the nucleotide metabolism in gills and cytoskeleton structure in hepatopancreas. This study demonstrated that the combination of proteomics and metabolomics could provide an insightful view into the effects of OA on oyster C. gigas.

BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE:

The gradually increased atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) has thrown the carbonate chemistry off balance and resulted in decreased seawater pH in marine ecosystem, termed ocean acidification (OA). Anthropogenic OA is postulated to affect the physiology of many marine calcifying organisms. However, the susceptibility and metabolic pathways of change in most calcifying animals are still far from being understood. To our knowledge, few studies have focused on the responses induced by pCO2 at both protein and metabolite levels. The pacific oyster C. gigas, widely distributed throughout most of the world's oceans, is a model organism for marine environmental science. In the present study, an integrated metabolomic and proteomic approach was used to elucidate the effects of ocean acidification on Pacific oyster C. gigas, hopefully shedding light on the physiological responses of marine mollusk to the OA stress.

KEYWORDS:

Crassostrea gigas; Metabolomics; Ocean acidification; Oyster; Proteomics

PMID:
25175059
DOI:
10.1016/j.jprot.2014.08.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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