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Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi. 2014 Jun;35(6):699-703.

[Influenza-associated-excess-hospitalization in children, Wuxi city, Jiangsu province, 2005-2010].

[Article in Chinese]

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Disease, Key Laboratory of Surveillance and Early-warning on Infectious Disease, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206, China.
2
Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention;
3
Wuxi City Center for Disease Control and Prevention.
4
Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention.
5
Division of Infectious Disease, Key Laboratory of Surveillance and Early-warning on Infectious Disease, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206, China. Email: yuhj@chinacdc.cn.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate the rates due to influenza-associated-excess-hospitalization in children aged 0-14 years in Wuxi city,Jiangsu province in 2005-2010.

METHODS:

We collected data on hospitalization due to influenza, pneumonia and other respiratory diseases from fourteen 2nd level or above hospitals in Wuxi, as well as data on influenza virological surveillance in southern China to fit the negative binomial regression models, to estimate the rate on influenza-associated-excess hospitalization.

RESULTS:

During 2005-2010, an average annual hospitalization rate appeared as 91.6‰ (79.2‰ -99.3‰). Among the total hospitalization eases, respiratory diseases accounted for 54.2%, while both influenza and pneumonia accounted for 38.1%. The average annual influenza- associated-excess-hospitalization rates due to influenza and pneumonia appeared as 1.28‰ (95% CI:0.29‰ -4.84‰), while 2.18‰ (95% CI:0.61‰ -6.79‰) due to respiratory diseases. In 2009, A (H1N1) pdm induced influenza pandemic caused 993 excess hospitalizations due to influenza/pneumonia and 1 042 excess hospitalizations due to respiratory diseases, with rates as 1.14‰ and 1.20‰ respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Both seasonal and pandemic A(H1N1)pdm influenza caused considerable burden on hospitalization in children aged 0-14 years inWuxi.

PMID:
25174475
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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