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Nat Neurosci. 2014 Oct;17(10):1395-403. doi: 10.1038/nn.3800. Epub 2014 Aug 31.

Encoding and decoding in parietal cortex during sensorimotor decision-making.

Author information

1
1] Center for Perceptual Systems, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA. [2] Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA. [3] Institute for Neuroscience, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA.
2
1] Institute for Neuroscience, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA. [2] Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
3
1] Center for Perceptual Systems, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA. [2] Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA. [3] Institute for Neuroscience, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA. [4] Department of Neuroscience, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA.
4
1] Center for Perceptual Systems, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA. [2] Department of Psychology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA. [3] Institute for Neuroscience, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA. [4] Department of Statistics and Data Science, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA.

Abstract

It has been suggested that the lateral intraparietal area (LIP) of macaques plays a fundamental role in sensorimotor decision-making. We examined the neural code in LIP at the level of individual spike trains using a statistical approach based on generalized linear models. We found that LIP responses reflected a combination of temporally overlapping task- and decision-related signals. Our model accounts for the detailed statistics of LIP spike trains and accurately predicts spike trains from task events on single trials. Moreover, we derived an optimal decoder for heterogeneous, multiplexed LIP responses that could be implemented in biologically plausible circuits. In contrast with interpretations of LIP as providing an instantaneous code for decision variables, we found that optimal decoding requires integrating LIP spikes over two distinct timescales. These analyses provide a detailed understanding of neural representations in LIP and a framework for studying the coding of multiplexed signals in higher brain areas.

PMID:
25174005
PMCID:
PMC4176983
DOI:
10.1038/nn.3800
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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