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Food Chem. 2015 Feb 1;168:183-9. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.07.050. Epub 2014 Jul 14.

Critical assessment of the formation of hydrogen peroxide in dough by fermenting yeast cells.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry & Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Centre (LFoRCe), KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, B-3001 Heverlee, Belgium.
2
VIB Laboratory for Systems Biology & CMPG Laboratory for Genetics and Genomics, KU Leuven, Bio-Incubator, Gaston Geenslaan 1, B-3001 Heverlee, Belgium.
3
Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry & Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Centre (LFoRCe), KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, B-3001 Heverlee, Belgium. Electronic address: christophe.courtin@biw.kuleuven.be.

Abstract

Fermentation of bread dough leads to strengthening of the dough matrix. This effect has previously been ascribed to the action of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by yeast in dough. In this study, we re-evaluate the production of H2O2 by yeast in dough and aqueous fermentation broth. Results show that the previously reported high levels of H2O2 in fermenting dough were most probably due to the lack of specificity of the potassium dichromate/acetic acid-based method used. Using the chemiluminescent HyPerBlu assay, no yeast H2O2 production could be detected in fermented dough or broth. Even though the formation of low levels of H2O2 cannot be ruled out due to the presence of catalase in flour and the fast reaction of H2O2 with gluten proteins, our results suggest that the changes in dough matrix rheological properties upon fermentation are not due to production of H2O2 by yeast.

KEYWORDS:

Chemiluminescence; Dough; Fermentation; HyPerBlu; Hydrogen peroxide; Rheology; Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Yeast

PMID:
25172698
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.07.050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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