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Science. 2014 Oct 3;346(6205):98-101. doi: 10.1126/science.1254536. Epub 2014 Aug 28.

T cell memory. Resident memory CD8 T cells trigger protective innate and adaptive immune responses.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. Center for Immunology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.
2
Department of Microbiology and Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
3
Department of Microbiology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. Center for Immunology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. masopust@umn.edu.

Abstract

The pathogen recognition theory dictates that, upon viral infection, the innate immune system first detects microbial products and then responds by providing instructions to adaptive CD8 T cells. Here, we show in mice that tissue resident memory CD8 T cells (T(RM) cells), non-recirculating cells located at common sites of infection, can achieve near-sterilizing immunity against viral infections by reversing this flow of information. Upon antigen resensitization within the mouse female reproductive mucosae, CD8(+) T(RM) cells secrete cytokines that trigger rapid adaptive and innate immune responses, including local humoral responses, maturation of local dendritic cells, and activation of natural killer cells. This provided near-sterilizing immunity against an antigenically unrelated viral infection. Thus, CD8(+) T(RM) cells rapidly trigger an antiviral state by amplifying receptor-derived signals from previously encountered pathogens.

PMID:
25170049
PMCID:
PMC4449618
DOI:
10.1126/science.1254536
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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