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Ann Behav Med. 2015 Apr;49(2):212-20. doi: 10.1007/s12160-014-9648-1.

Early changes in socioeconomic status do not predict changes in body mass in the first decade of life.

Author information

1
The Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York, USA, Lstarkey@gc.cuny.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Many studies link childhood socioeconomic status (SES) to body mass index (BMI), but few account for the impact of socioeconomic mobility throughout the lifespan.

PURPOSE:

This study aims to investigate the impact of socioeconomic mobility on changes in BMI in childhood. Analyses tested whether [1] socioeconomic status influences BMI, [2] changes in socioeconomic status impact changes in BMI, and [3] timing of socioeconomic status mobility impacts BMI.

METHODS:

Secondary data spanning birth to age 9 were analyzed. SES and BMI were investigated with gender, birth weight, maternal race/ethnicity, and maternal nativity as covariates. Autoregressive structural equation modeling and latent growth modeling were used.

RESULTS:

Socioeconomic status in the first year of life predicted body mass index. Child covariates were consistently associated with body mass index. Rate of change in socioeconomic status did not predict change in body mass index.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings suggest that early socioeconomic status may most influence body mass in later childhood.

PMID:
25169848
DOI:
10.1007/s12160-014-9648-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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