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Trop Anim Health Prod. 2014 Dec;46(8):1321-40. doi: 10.1007/s11250-014-0656-8. Epub 2014 Aug 30.

Systematic review of the prevalence of paratuberculosis in cattle, sheep, and goats in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Author information

1
Epidemiología y Salud Pública Veterinaria, Centauro, Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín, Colombia, jorge.fernandez@udea.edu.co.

Abstract

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes paratuberculosis or Johne's disease (JD) in domestic ruminants and wild species. The aim of the present study was to systematically review the prevalence of paratuberculosis among farmed animals (cattle, sheep, and goats) in Latin America and the Caribbean. The initial search for existing publications reporting systematic reviews and primary studies was carried out by searching the available databases. For the final selection of studies, an initial screen for basic eligibility and a detailed appraisal of quality were performed. After study selection, the relevant data were extracted. The detailed appraisal generated 24 publications that reported 52 studies, of which 73.1, 11.5, and 15.4 % were from cattle, sheep, and goats, respectively. Thirty-three (63.5 %) of the studies were animal level studies, while 19 (36.5 %) were herd-/flock-level studies. No flock-level studies on prevalence in sheep were found. Studies in Latin American and Caribbean countries revealed an overall prevalence of 16.9 (95 % CI (confidence interval) 13.2-20.5) and 75.8 % (95 % CI 50.1-101.5) in cattle at the animal and herd levels, respectively; the prevalence was 16 % (95 % CI 7.9-24.1) in sheep at the animal level and 4.3 % (95 % CI 1.9-6.8) and 3.7 % (95 % CI 0.1-7.4) in goats at the animal and flock levels, respectively. In general, prevalence results reported by the studies were insufficient to accurately determine the prevalence of paratuberculosis in farmed animals in Latin America and the Caribbean. Several flaws in the design of studies limit the quality of evidence regarding the prevalence of paratuberculosis in the region.

PMID:
25169696
DOI:
10.1007/s11250-014-0656-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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