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Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2014 Nov 1;203:19-27. doi: 10.1016/j.resp.2014.08.007. Epub 2014 Aug 25.

Relationship between simulated extravehicular activity tasks and measurements of physical performance.

Author information

1
Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA. Electronic address: cade@ou.edu.
2
Department of Kinesiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA; Department of Anatomy and Physiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.
3
Department of Kinesiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.

Abstract

The purpose was to evaluate the relationships between tests of fitness and two activities that simulate components of Lunar- and Martian-based extravehicular activities (EVA). Seventy-one subjects completed two field tests: a physical abilities test and a 10km Walkback test. The relationships between test times and the following parameters were determined: running V˙O2max, gas exchange threshold (GET), speed at V˙O2max (s-V˙O2max), highest sustainable rate of aerobic metabolism [critical speed (CS)], and the finite distance that could be covered above CS (D'): arm cranking V˙O2peak, GET, critical power (CP), and the finite work that can be performed above CP (W'). CS, running V˙O2max, s-V˙O2max, and arm cranking V˙O2peak had the highest correlations with the physical abilities field test (r=0.66-0.82, P<0.001). For the 10km Walkback, CS, s-V˙O2max, and running V˙O2max were significant predictors (r=0.64-0.85, P<0.001). CS and to a lesser extent V˙O2max are most strongly associated with tasks that simulate aspects of EVA performance, highlighting CS as a method for evaluating astronaut physical capacity.

KEYWORDS:

Critical speed; Endurance performance; Extravehicular activity

PMID:
25169116
DOI:
10.1016/j.resp.2014.08.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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