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J Athl Train. 2014 Jul-Aug;49(4):493-506. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-49.2.19.

Middle school injuries: a 20-year (1988-2008) multisport evaluation.

Author information

1
Punahou School, Honolulu, HI.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Data on the incidence of injury in middle school sports are limited.

OBJECTIVE:

To describe overall, practice, and game injury rate patterns in 29 middle school sports.

DESIGN:

Descriptive epidemiology study.

SETTING:

Injury data collected over a 20-year period (1988-2008) at a single school.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:

Boy (n = 8078) and girl (n = 5960) athletes participating in 14 and 15 middle school sports, respectively.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Injury status and athlete-exposures (AEs) were collected by certified athletic trainers. Incidence rates per 1000 AEs (injuries/AEs) were calculated for overall incidence, practices and games, injury location, injury type, and injury severity (time lost from participation). Rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to compare injury rates for sex-matched sports.

RESULTS:

Football had the highest injury rate for all injuries (16.03/1000 AEs) and for time-loss injuries (8.486/1000 AEs). In matched middle school sports, girls exhibited a higher injury rate for all injuries (7.686/1000 AEs, RR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.1, 1.2) and time-loss injuries (2.944/1000 AEs, RR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.0, 1.2) than boys (all injuries: 6.684/1000 AEs, time-loss injuries: 2.702/1000 AEs). Girls had a higher injury rate during practices (3.30/1000 AEs) than games (1.67/1000 AEs, RR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.7, 2.4) for all sports. Only gymnastics (RR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.3, 3.8) had a higher game injury rate for girls. Practice and game injury rates were nearly identical for boys in all sports (RR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.9, 1.1). Only football (RR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.4, 0.6) and boys' wrestling (RR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.3, 0.8) reported higher game injury rates. Tendinitis injuries accounted for 19.1% of all middle school injuries.

CONCLUSIONS:

The risk for sport-related injury at the middle school level was greater during practices than games and greater for girls than boys in sex-matched sports. Conditioning programs may be needed to address the high rate of tendinitis injuries.

KEYWORDS:

adolescents; athletes; epidemiology; sports

PMID:
25167211
PMCID:
PMC4151838
DOI:
10.4085/1062-6050-49.2.19
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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