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Pediatr Res. 2014 Dec;76(6):500-7. doi: 10.1038/pr.2014.128. Epub 2014 Aug 28.

A detailed comparison of mouse and human cardiac development.

Author information

1
1] Laboratory of Developmental Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland [2] Children's National Heart Institute, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC.
2
1] Laboratory of Developmental Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland [2] George Washington University Medical School, Washington, DC.
3
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Schneider Children's Hospital, New Hyde Park, New York.
4
1] Laboratory of Developmental Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland [2] Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland.
5
Congenital Anomaly Research Center, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.
6
Children's National Heart Institute, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC.
7
1] Laboratory of Developmental Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland [2] Department of Developmental Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mouse mutants are used to model human congenital cardiovascular disease. Few studies exist comparing normal cardiovascular development in mice vs. humans. We carried out a systematic comparative analysis of mouse and human fetal cardiovascular development.

METHODS:

Episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) was performed on 66 wild-type mouse embryos from embryonic day (E) 9.5 to birth; 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional datasets were compared with EFIC and magnetic resonance images from a study of 52 human fetuses (Carnegie stage 13-23).

RESULTS:

Time course of atrial, ventricular, and outflow septation were outlined and followed a similar sequence in both species. Bilateral venae cavae and prominent atrial appendages were seen in the mouse fetus; in human fetuses, atrial appendages were small, and a single right superior vena cava was present. In contrast to humans with separate pulmonary vein orifices, a pulmonary venous confluence with one orifice enters the left atrium in mice.

CONCLUSION:

The cardiac developmental sequences observed in mouse and human fetuses are comparable, with minor differences in atrial and venous morphology. These comparisons of mouse and human cardiac development strongly support that mouse morphogenesis is a good model for human development.

PMID:
25167202
PMCID:
PMC4233008
DOI:
10.1038/pr.2014.128
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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