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PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2014 Aug 28;8(8):e3096. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003096. eCollection 2014 Aug.

Co-evolution between an endosymbiont and its nematode host: Wolbachia asymmetric posterior localization and AP polarity establishment.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, Sinsheimer Labs, University of California, Santa Cruz, California, United States of America; Centre de Recherche de Biochimie Macromoléculaire, CNRS, Montpellier, France.
2
Molecular Parasitology, New England Biolabs, Ipswich, Massachusetts, United States of America.
3
Department of Biology and Microbiology, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, United States of America.
4
Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, Sinsheimer Labs, University of California, Santa Cruz, California, United States of America.

Abstract

While bacterial symbionts influence a variety of host cellular responses throughout development, there are no documented instances in which symbionts influence early embryogenesis. Here we demonstrate that Wolbachia, an obligate endosymbiont of the parasitic filarial nematodes, is required for proper anterior-posterior polarity establishment in the filarial nematode B. malayi. Characterization of pre- and post-fertilization events in B. malayi reveals that, unlike C. elegans, the centrosomes are maternally derived and produce a cortical-based microtubule organizing center prior to fertilization. We establish that Wolbachia rely on these cortical microtubules and dynein to concentrate at the posterior cortex. Wolbachia also rely on PAR-1 and PAR-3 polarity cues for normal concentration at the posterior cortex. Finally, we demonstrate that Wolbachia depletion results in distinct anterior-posterior polarity defects. These results provide a striking example of endosymbiont-host co-evolution operating on the core initial developmental event of axis determination.

PMID:
25165813
PMCID:
PMC4148215
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0003096
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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