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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Sep 9;111(36):13145-50. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1412008111. Epub 2014 Aug 25.

Commensal bacteria protect against food allergen sensitization.

Author information

1
Departments of Pathology.
2
Departments of Pathology and Microbiology-Immunology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611;
3
Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland;
4
Department of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125; and.
5
Medicine, and.
6
Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637;
7
Medicine, and Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439.
8
Departments of Pathology, Medicine, and cnagler@bsd.uchicago.edu.

Abstract

Environmentally induced alterations in the commensal microbiota have been implicated in the increasing prevalence of food allergy. We show here that sensitization to a food allergen is increased in mice that have been treated with antibiotics or are devoid of a commensal microbiota. By selectively colonizing gnotobiotic mice, we demonstrate that the allergy-protective capacity is conferred by a Clostridia-containing microbiota. Microarray analysis of intestinal epithelial cells from gnotobiotic mice revealed a previously unidentified mechanism by which Clostridia regulate innate lymphoid cell function and intestinal epithelial permeability to protect against allergen sensitization. Our findings will inform the development of novel approaches to prevent or treat food allergy based on modulating the composition of the intestinal microbiota.

KEYWORDS:

IL-22; barrier; microbiome

PMID:
25157157
PMCID:
PMC4246970
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1412008111
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Publication types, MeSH terms, Substances, Secondary source ID, Grant support

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