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J Biol Chem. 2014 Oct 24;289(43):29881-91. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M114.601864. Epub 2014 Aug 25.

Cardiomyocyte-specific loss of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) reproduces the abnormalities in lipids found in severe heart failure.

Author information

1
From the Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Nutrition and Institute of Systems Biomedicine, Peking University Health Science Center, 100083 Beijing, China.
2
From the Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Nutrition and.
3
From the Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Nutrition and Department of Geriatrics, Affiliated Provincial Hospital, Anhui Medical University, 230001 Hefei, China.
4
Institute of Systems Biomedicine, Peking University Health Science Center, 100083 Beijing, China.
5
Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease and Departments of Medicine and Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94158.
6
Cardiology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York 10032.
7
Astra-Zeneca Company, 431 50 Mölndal, Sweden.
8
Astra-Zeneca Company, 431 50 Mölndal, Sweden, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, 751 05 Uppsala, Sweden, and.
9
Department of Geriatrics, Affiliated Provincial Hospital, Anhui Medical University, 230001 Hefei, China.
10
From the Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Nutrition and Cardiology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York 10032, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, New York University Langone School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 Ira.Goldberg@nyumc.org.

Abstract

Diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) catalyzes the final step in triglyceride synthesis, the conversion of diacylglycerol (DAG) to triglyceride. Dgat1(-/-) mice exhibit a number of beneficial metabolic effects including reduced obesity and improved insulin sensitivity and no known cardiac dysfunction. In contrast, failing human hearts have severely reduced DGAT1 expression associated with accumulation of DAGs and ceramides. To test whether DGAT1 loss alone affects heart function, we created cardiomyocyte-specific DGAT1 knock-out (hDgat1(-/-)) mice. hDgat1(-/-) mouse hearts had 95% increased DAG and 85% increased ceramides compared with floxed controls. 50% of these mice died by 9 months of age. The heart failure marker brain natriuretic peptide increased 5-fold in hDgat1(-/-) hearts, and fractional shortening (FS) was reduced. This was associated with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and cluster of differentiation 36. We crossed hDgat1(-/-) mice with previously described enterocyte-specific Dgat1 knock-out mice (hiDgat1(-/-)). This corrected the early mortality, improved FS, and reduced cardiac ceramide and DAG content. Treatment of hDgat1(-/-) mice with the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exenatide also improved FS and reduced heart DAG and ceramide content. Increased fatty acid uptake into hDgat1(-/-) hearts was normalized by exenatide. Reduced activation of protein kinase Cα (PKCα), which is increased by DAG and ceramides, paralleled the reductions in these lipids. Our mouse studies show that loss of DGAT1 reproduces the lipid abnormalities seen in severe human heart failure.

KEYWORDS:

Animal Model; Cardiac Metabolism; Ceramide; Diacylglycerol; Heart Failure; Lipid; Lipotoxicity; Metabolism; Signal Transduction

PMID:
25157099
PMCID:
PMC4207999
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M114.601864
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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