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Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2015 May;30(3):257-67. doi: 10.1177/1533317514545377. Epub 2014 Aug 25.

Benefits of mindfulness training for patients with progressive cognitive decline and their caregivers.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience Program, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA  Ken A. Paller and Jessica D. Creery shared co-first-authorship for this article kap@northwestern.edu.
2
Department of Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience Program, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA  Ken A. Paller and Jessica D. Creery shared co-first-authorship for this article.
3
Department of Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience Program, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.
4
Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
5
The Family Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.

Abstract

New strategies are needed to help people cope with the repercussions of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Patients and caregivers face different challenges, but here we investigated an intervention tailored for this combined population. The program focused on training skills such as attending to the present moment nonjudgmentally, which may help reduce maladaptive emotional responses. Patients participated together with caregivers in weekly group sessions over 8 weeks. An assessment battery was individually administered before and after the program. Pre-post analyses revealed several benefits, including increased quality-of-life ratings, fewer depressive symptoms, and better subjective sleep quality. In addition, participants indicated that they were grateful for the opportunity to learn to apply mindfulness skills and that they would recommend the program to others. In conclusion, mindfulness training can be beneficial for patients and their caregivers, it can be delivered at low cost to combined groups, and it is worthy of further investigation.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; caregiver stress; mild cognitive impairment; mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR); neurodegenerative disorders

PMID:
25154985
PMCID:
PMC4363074
DOI:
10.1177/1533317514545377
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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