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J Diet Suppl. 2016;13(1):1-15. doi: 10.3109/19390211.2014.952864. Epub 2014 Aug 25.

Black Currant Nectar Reduces Muscle Damage and Inflammation Following a Bout of High-Intensity Eccentric Contractions.

Author information

1
a 1 University of the Incarnate Word, School of Math, Science, & Engineering, Department of Biology, San Antonio, Texas, USA.
2
b 2 University of the Incarnate Word, School of Nursing & Health Professions, Department of Athletic Training, San Antonio, Texas, USA.
3
c 3 University of the Incarnate Word, School of Math, Science, & Engineering, Department of Nutrition, San Antonio, Texas, USA.
4
d 4 University of the Incarnate Word, School of Math, Science, & Engineering, Department of Chemistry, San Antonio, Texas, USA.

Abstract

This investigation determined the efficacy of black currant nectar (BCN) in reducing symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). Sixteen college students were randomly assigned to drink either 16 oz of BCN or a placebo (PLA) twice a day for eight consecutive days. A bout of eccentric knee extensions (3 × 10 sets @ 115% of 1RM) was performed on the fourth day. Outcome measures included muscle soreness (subjective scale from 0 to 10) and blood markers of muscle damage (creatine kinase, CK), inflammation (interleukin-6, IL-6), and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Although there were no differences in reported soreness between groups, consumption of BCN reduced CK levels at both 48 (PLA = 82.13% vs. BCN = -6.71%, p = .042) and 96 h post exercise (PLA = 74.96% vs. BCN = -12.11%, p = .030). The change in IL-6 was higher in the PLA group (PLA = 8.84% vs. BCN = -6.54%, p = .023) at 24 h post exercise. The change in ORAC levels was higher in the treatment group (BCN = 2.68% vs. PLA = -6.02%, p = .039) at 48 h post exercise. Our results demonstrate that consumption of BCN prior to and after a bout of eccentric exercise attenuates muscle damage and inflammation.

KEYWORDS:

anthocyanins; antioxidants; inflammation; muscle damage; oxidative damage

PMID:
25153307
DOI:
10.3109/19390211.2014.952864
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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