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J Occup Environ Med. 2014 Sep;56(9):927-34. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000276.

Do workplace health promotion (wellness) programs work?

Author information

1
From Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-Institute for Health and Productivity Studies (Dr Goetzel) and Truven Health Analytics (Drs Goetzel and Tabrizi), Bethesda, Md; Truven Health Analytics (Dr Henke), Cambridge, Mass; University of Arizona School of Medicine and University of California San Francisco School of Medicine (Dr Pelletier); US Preventive Medicine (Dr Loeppke), Jacksonville, Fla; American Psychological Association (Dr Ballard), Washington, DC; StayWell (Drs Grossmeier and Anderson), St Paul, Minn; The Vitality Institute (Dr Yach), New York, NY; The University of Alabama (Dr Kelly), Tuscaloosa; Mercer (Dr McCalister), Austin, Tex; Optum (Dr Serxner), San Francisco, Calif; Population Health Alliance (Dr Selecky), Washington, DC; Exxon Mobil Corporation (Dr Shallenberger), Houston, Tex; Stanford University School of Medicine (Dr Fries), Palo Alto, Calif; The Dow Chemical Company (Dr Baase), Midland, Mich; Johnson & Johnson (Dr Isaac), New Brunswick; Prudential Financial (Dr Crighton), Newark, NJ; USAA (Dr Wald), San Antonio, Tex; IBM Corporation (Ms Exum), Somers, NY; Cummins, Inc (Dr Shurney), Columbus, Ind; and American Specialty Health (Dr Metz), San Diego, Calif.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To respond to the question, "Do workplace health promotion programs work?"

METHODS:

A compilation of the evidence on workplace programs' effectiveness coupled with recommendations for critical review of outcome studies. Also, reviewed are recent studies questioning the value of workplace programs.

RESULTS:

Evidence accumulated over the past three decades shows that well-designed and well-executed programs that are founded on evidence-based principles can achieve positive health and financial outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Employers seeking a program that "works" are urged to consider their goals and whether they have an organizational culture that can facilitate success. Employers who choose to adopt a health promotion program should use best and promising practices to maximize the likelihood of achieving positive results.

PMID:
25153303
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0000000000000276
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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