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Alzheimers Dement. 2015 Feb;11(2):195-206.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2014.06.006. Epub 2014 Aug 20.

The use of biomarkers for the etiologic diagnosis of MCI in Europe: an EADC survey.

Author information

1
LENITEM (Laboratory of Epidemiology, Neuroimaging and Telemedicine), IRCCS Istituto Centro S. Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratelli, Brescia, Italy; Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.
2
LENITEM (Laboratory of Epidemiology, Neuroimaging and Telemedicine), IRCCS Istituto Centro S. Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratelli, Brescia, Italy.
3
Dementia Research Group, School of Clinical Sciences, University of Bristol, Frenchay Hospital, Bristol, UK.
4
Servicio Neurologia, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía Córdoba, Spain.
5
Department of Gerontological, Geriatric and Psychiatric Sciences, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy.
6
Victoria Centre, Swindon, UK.
7
Service de Neurologie et Neuropsychologie, CHU Timone and INSERM U1106, Aix-Marseille Univ, Marseille, France.
8
Bordeaux CMRR, France.
9
Laboratory of Neurosciences, Inst of Molecular Medicine, Lisbon, Portugal.
10
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
11
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Zentralinstitut für Seelische, Gesundheit Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany.
12
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
13
University of Eastern Finland, Univ Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
14
Memory Disorders Research Unit, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
15
Klinik und Poliklinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
16
Department of Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; German Center for Neurodegenerative Disease (DZNE), Bonn, Germany.
17
RICE - The Research Institute for the Care of Older People, Royal United Hospital, Bath, UK.
18
Technische Universität Psychiatrische Klinik, Munchen, Germany.
19
Mercer's Institue for Research on Ageing, St James' Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
20
Memory Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Santa Creu i, Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain.
21
Fundacion CITA-Alzheimer Fundazioa, San Sebastian, Spain.
22
Section of Gerontology and Geriatrics, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
23
Department of Neurology, Univ Hospital Alexandrovska, Sofia, Bulgaria.
24
Memory Clinic, University Center for Medicine of Aging Basel, Felix Platter Hospital, Basel, Switzerland.
25
Clinical Neurology, Dept of Neuroscience (DINOGMI), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy.
26
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Radboud University Medical Centre, Radboud Alzheimer Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
27
CHU de Lille, Université de Lille 2, Lille, France.
28
Department of Psychiatry, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
29
Université de Liège, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Belgium.
30
Servicio de Geriatría, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain.
31
Neurology Department, Coimbra University Hospital, Coimbra, Portugal.
32
Neurologie de la Mémoire et du Langage, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, INSERM UMR S894, Centre Hospitalier Sainte Anne, Paris, France.
33
3rd Department of Neurology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
34
Alzheimer Centre, Vrije Univ Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Alzheimer centre Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.
35
Clinical Memory Research Unit, Lund University, Memory Clinic Malmö, Sweden.
36
University of Oxford, Nuffield Dept of Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.
37
Memory Assessment and Research Centre MARC, Moorgreen Hospital, Southampton, UK.
38
German Center for Neurodegenerative Disease (DZNE), Bonn, Germany; Department of Psychiatry Research, Zurich, Switzerland.
39
Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey.
40
Department of Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, University Hospitals and University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
41
LENITEM (Laboratory of Epidemiology, Neuroimaging and Telemedicine), IRCCS Istituto Centro S. Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratelli, Brescia, Italy; Memory Clinic and Laboratoire de Neuroimagerie du Vieillissement (LANVIE), University Hospitals and University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: giovanni.frisoni@gmail.com.

Abstract

We investigated the use of Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers in European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium centers and assessed their perceived usefulness for the etiologic diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We surveyed availability, frequency of use, and confidence in diagnostic usefulness of markers of brain amyloidosis (amyloid positron emission tomography [PET], cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] Aβ42) and neurodegeneration (medial temporal atrophy [MTA] on MR, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [FDG-PET], CSF tau). The most frequently used biomarker is visually rated MTA (75% of the 37 responders reported using it "always/frequently") followed by CSF markers (22%), FDG-PET (16%), and amyloid-PET (3%). Only 45% of responders perceive MTA as contributing to diagnostic confidence, where the contribution was rated as "moderate". Seventy-nine percent of responders felt "very/extremely" comfortable delivering a diagnosis of MCI due to AD when both amyloid and neuronal injury biomarkers were abnormal (P < .02 versus any individual biomarker). Responders largely agreed that a combination of amyloidosis and neuronal injury biomarkers was a strongly indicative AD signature.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Biomarkers; Diagnosis; Mild cognitive impairment

PMID:
25150733
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2014.06.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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