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Psychiatr Clin North Am. 2014 Sep;37(3):353-74. doi: 10.1016/j.psc.2014.06.001.

Pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome.

Author information

1
Rothman Center for Pediatric Neuropsychiatry, USF Pediatrics, 880 6th Street South, Suite 460, Box 7523, St Petersburg, FL 33701, USA. Electronic address: tmurphy@health.usf.edu.
2
Rothman Center for Pediatric Neuropsychiatry, USF Pediatrics, 880 6th Street South, Suite 460, Box 7523, St Petersburg, FL 33701, USA.
3
Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, 230 S Frontage Road, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

Abstract

Whether some instances of obsessive-compulsive disorder are secondary to infectious and/or autoimmune processes is still under scientific debate. The nosology has undergone an iterative process of criteria and acronyms from PITANDS to PANDAS to PANS (or CANS for neurology). This review focuses on the clinical presentation, assessment, proposed pathophysiology, and treatment of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus (PANDAS), and the newest iteration, pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). Children who have these symptoms, which have become known as PANS, have been described by their parents as "changed children."

KEYWORDS:

PANDAS; Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder; Streptococcal infections

PMID:
25150567
DOI:
10.1016/j.psc.2014.06.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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