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Prev Med. 2014 Dec;69:5-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.08.022. Epub 2014 Aug 20.

Joint association of physical activity in leisure and total sitting time with metabolic syndrome amongst 15,235 Danish adults: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, 1353 Copenhagen K, Denmark. Electronic address: cbj@niph.dk.
2
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, 1353 Copenhagen K, Denmark. Electronic address: ajni@niph.dk.
3
School of Public Health, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. Electronic address: adrian.bauman@sydney.edu.au.
4
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, 1353 Copenhagen K, Denmark. Electronic address: jst@niph.dk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent studies suggest that physical inactivity as well as sitting time are associated with metabolic syndrome. Our aim was to examine joint associations of leisure time physical activity and total daily sitting time with metabolic syndrome.

METHODS:

Leisure time physical activity and total daily sitting time were assessed by self-report in 15,235 men and women in the Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008. Associations between leisure time physical activity, total sitting time and metabolic syndrome were investigated in logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Adjusted odds ratios (OR) for metabolic syndrome were 2.14 (95% CI: 1.88-2.43) amongst participants who were inactive in leisure time compared to the most active, and 1.42 (95% CI: 1.26-1.61) amongst those who sat for ≥10h/day compared to <6h/day. Within strata of leisure time physical activity, sitting time was positively associated with metabolic syndrome. For example, in the moderate to vigorous physical activity stratum, ORs were 1.31 (95% CI: 1.11-1.54) and 1.48 (95% CI: 1.16-1.88) in participants who sat 6-10 and ≥10h/day compared to <6h/day.

CONCLUSION:

Higher amounts of sitting time seem to be associated with a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome, even amongst individuals who are physically active.

KEYWORDS:

Health surveys; Metabolic syndrome; Physical activity; Sedentary lifestyles

PMID:
25150385
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.08.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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