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Psychiatry Res. 2014 Dec 15;220(1-2):129-34. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.07.067. Epub 2014 Aug 6.

Neurocognition in schizophrenia: from prodrome to multi-episode illness.

Author information

1
NESMOS Department (Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sense Organs) Unit of Psychiatry, Sant׳Andrea Hospital, School of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. Electronic address: vale.corigliano@hotmail.it.
2
NESMOS Department (Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sense Organs) Unit of Neurology, Sant׳Andrea Hospital, School of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.
3
NESMOS Department (Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sense Organs) Unit of Psychiatry, Sant׳Andrea Hospital, School of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.

Abstract

Individuals with schizophrenia present a neuropsychological deficit throughout the course of the disorder. Few studies have addressed the progression of the deficit since the prodromal phase of the disorder. This investigation explored neurocognition in accordance with the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) Consensus recommendations. The aim of the study was to explore the presence of neurocognitive impairment in ultra-high-risk individuals and the stage of this impairment in samples at different phases of illness. Thirty-six individuals with a prodromal syndrome, 53 first-episode and 44 multi-episode schizophrenia patients were assessed to examine neuropsychological performance. ANCOVA analysis adjusted for possible confounder factors and planned contrasts with healthy controls were undertaken. The results revealed deficits in speed-of-processing, visual-learning and social-cognition in prodromal individuals, and of all other neuropsychological domains in both first-episode and multi-episode patients. Furthermore impairment was found in the first-episode and in the multi-episode group, respectively on working-memory and attention. Within the framework of the neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia, our results suggest the presence of neuropsychological impairment before the onset of full-blown psychosis. Moreover, the deficits are larger in the more chronic groups, according to the theory of an ongoing neurodevelopmental alteration.

KEYWORDS:

Early psychosis; First-episode schizophrenia; MATRICS; Neurocognitive impairment; Neurodevelopmental model; Ultra-high risk

PMID:
25149131
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2014.07.067
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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