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Peptides. 2014 Nov;61:12-6. doi: 10.1016/j.peptides.2014.08.003. Epub 2014 Aug 19.

Plasma vasopressin concentrations positively predict cerebrospinal fluid vasopressin concentrations in human neonates.

Author information

1
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Electronic address: dcarson@stanford.edu.
2
Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
3
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
4
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; Departments of Fetal and Transitional Medicine, Neonatology, and the Center for Neuroscience Research, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010, USA.
7
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Electronic address: kjparker@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Central arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a critical role in mammalian social behavior and has been hypothesized to be a biomarker of certain human neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism. However, opportunities to collect post-mortem brain tissue or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from children are extremely limited, and the use of less invasive peripheral assessments (e.g., blood, urine, or saliva) of AVP as a proxy for more invasive central measures has not been well validated. Further, almost nothing is known about AVP biology in very young infants. Therefore in the present study we concomitantly collected basal CSF and plasma samples from N = 20 neonates undergoing clinical sepsis evaluation (all were sepsis negative) and quantified AVP concentrations via well-validated enzyme-immunoassay methodology. Plasma AVP concentrations significantly and positively predicted CSF AVP concentrations (r = 0.73, p = 0.0021), and this relationship persisted when variance attributed to sex, gestational age, and sample collection time was controlled for in the statistical model (r = 0.75, p = 0.0047). These findings provide preliminary support for the use of basal plasma AVP measurement as a proxy for basal brain AVP activity in pediatric populations. Future studies are now required to determine the relationship between behavioral measures and AVP concentrations in both central and peripheral compartments in young infants and older children.

KEYWORDS:

Arginine vasopressin; Cerebrospinal fluid; Human neonate; Lumbar puncture; Oxytocin; Plasma

PMID:
25148831
DOI:
10.1016/j.peptides.2014.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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