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Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med. 2014 Aug 21;4(11):a017418. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a017418.

Curing color blindness--mice and nonhuman primates.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98109.

Abstract

It has been possible to use viral-mediated gene therapy to transform dichromatic (red-green color-blind) primates to trichromatic. Even though the third cone type was added after the end of developmental critical periods, treated animals acquired red-green color vision. What happened in the treated animals may represent a recapitulation of the evolution of trichromacy, which seems to have evolved with the acquisition of a third cone type without the need for subsequent modification to the circuitry. Some transgenic mice in which a third cone type was added also acquired trichromacy. However, compared with treated primates, red-green color vision in mice is poor, indicating large differences between mice and monkeys in their ability to take advantage of the new input. These results have implications for understanding the limits and opportunities for using gene therapy to treat vision disorders caused by defects in cone function.

PMID:
25147187
PMCID:
PMC4208712
DOI:
10.1101/cshperspect.a017418
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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