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Science. 2014 Aug 22;345(6199):916-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1253149.

Nanoparticle growth. Facet development during platinum nanocube growth.

Author information

1
Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.
2
Gatan, Incorporated, 5794 West Las Positas Boulevard, Pleasanton, CA 94588, USA.
3
National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.
4
Department of Structural Biology, Medical School, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
5
Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. hmzheng@lbl.gov.

Abstract

An understanding of how facets of a nanocrystal develop is critical for controlling nanocrystal shape and designing novel functional materials. However, the atomic pathways of nanocrystal facet development are mostly unknown because of the lack of direct observation. We report the imaging of platinum nanocube growth in a liquid cell using transmission electron microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution. The growth rates of all low index facets are similar until the {100} facets stop growth. The continuous growth of the rest facets leads to a nanocube. Our calculation shows that the much lower ligand mobility on the {100} facets is responsible for the arresting of {100} growing facets. These findings shed light on nanocrystal shape-control mechanisms and future design of nanomaterials.

PMID:
25146287
DOI:
10.1126/science.1253149
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