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Environ Pollut. 2014 Nov;194:181-187. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2014.07.031. Epub 2014 Aug 19.

Urinary excretion of arsenic following rice consumption.

Author information

1
Institute for Global Food Security, Queens University Belfast, David Keir Building, Malone Road, Belfast, BT9 5BN, Northern Ireland, UK. Electronic address: aa.meharg@qub.ac.uk.
2
Institute for Global Food Security, Queens University Belfast, David Keir Building, Malone Road, Belfast, BT9 5BN, Northern Ireland, UK. Electronic address: p.williams@qub.ac.uk.
3
Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU, Scotland, UK.
4
Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU, Scotland, UK; Department of Soil Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, Bangladesh.
5
Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU, Scotland, UK; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY, UK.
6
Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU, Scotland, UK; Department of Soil Science, Soikoine University of Agriculture, P. O. Box 3008, Morogoro, Tanzania.
7
Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU, Scotland, UK; Department of Plant Production, University of Sirte, Libya.
8
Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU, Scotland, UK; University of the Highlands and Islands, 12b Ness Walk, Inverness, Scotland, IV3 5SQ, UK.
9
Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU, Scotland, UK; European Commission, Ispra, Italy.
10
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort Univ., The Gateway, Leicester LE1 9BH, UK.

Abstract

Patterns of arsenic excretion were followed in a cohort (n = 6) eating a defined rice diet, 300 g per day d.wt. where arsenic speciation was characterized in cooked rice, following a period of abstinence from rice, and other high arsenic containing foods. A control group who did not consume rice were also monitored. The rice consumed in the study contained inorganic arsenic and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) at a ratio of 1:1, yet the urine speciation was dominated by DMA (90%). At steady state (rice consumption/urinary excretion) ∼40% of rice derived arsenic was excreted via urine. By monitoring of each urine pass throughout the day it was observed that there was considerable variation (up to 13-fold) for an individual's total arsenic urine content, and that there was a time dependent variation in urinary total arsenic content. This calls into question the robustness of routinely used first pass/spot check urine sampling for arsenic analysis.

KEYWORDS:

Arsenic; Rice; Speciation; Urine

PMID:
25145278
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2014.07.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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