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Br J Cancer. 2014 Oct 28;111(9):1718-25. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2014.466. Epub 2014 Aug 21.

Subgroup effects in a randomised trial of different types and doses of exercise during breast cancer chemotherapy.

Author information

1
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2H9, Canada.
2
School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC V6T 1Z1, Canada.
3
1] Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 1Z2, Canada [2] Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB T6G 1Z2, Canada.
4
1] Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada [2] Department of Medical Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada.
5
Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Research, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB T2S 3C3, Canada.
6
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 1C9, Canada.
7
Division of Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, ON K1Y 4W7, Canada.
8
Department of Medical Oncology, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L8, Canada.
9
1] Department of Medical Oncology, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L8, Canada [2] Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON K1Y 4E9, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Trial tested different types and doses of exercise in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Here, we explore potential moderators of the exercise training responses.

METHODS:

Breast cancer patients initiating chemotherapy (N=301) were randomly assigned to three times a week, supervised exercise of a standard dose of 25-30 min of aerobic exercise, a higher dose of 50-60 min of aerobic exercise, or a higher dose of 50-60 min of combined aerobic and resistance exercise. Outcomes were patient-reported symptoms and health-related fitness. Moderators were baseline demographic, exercise/fitness, and cancer variables.

RESULTS:

Body mass index moderated the effects of the exercise interventions on bodily pain (P for interaction=0.038), endocrine symptoms (P for interaction=0.029), taxane/neuropathy symptoms (P for interaction=0.013), aerobic fitness (P for interaction=0.041), muscular strength (P for interaction=0.007), and fat mass (P for interaction=0.005). In general, healthy weight patients responded better to the higher-dose exercise interventions than overweight/obese patients. Menopausal status, age, and baseline fitness moderated the effects on patient-reported symptoms. Premenopausal, younger, and fitter patients achieved greater benefits from the higher-dose exercise interventions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Healthy weight, fitter, and premenopausal/younger breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy are more likely to benefit from higher-dose exercise interventions.

PMID:
25144625
PMCID:
PMC4453726
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2014.466
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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