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Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality.

Editors

Institute of Medicine (US) Vaccine Safety Committee; Stratton KR, Howe CJ, Johnston RB Jr., editors.

Source

Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 1994.
The National Academies Collection: Reports funded by National Institutes of Health.

Excerpt

Childhood immunization is one of the major public health measures of the 20th century and is now receiving special attention from the Clinton administration. At the same time, some parents and health professionals are questioning the safety of vaccines because of the occurrence of rare adverse events after immunization. This volume provides the most thorough literature review available about links between common childhood vaccines--tetanus, diphtheria, measles, mumps, polio, Haemophilus influenzae b, and hepatitis B--and specific types of disorders or death. The authors discuss approaches to evidence and causality and examine the consequences--neurologic and immunologic disorders and death--linked with immunization. Discussion also includes background information on the development of the vaccines and details about the case reports, clinical trials, and other evidence associating each vaccine with specific disorders. This comprehensive volume will be an important resource to anyone concerned about the immunization controversy: public health officials, pediatricians, attorneys, researchers, and parents.

Copyright 1994 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

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