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Colorectal Cancer. 2014 Jun;3(3):253-263.

Examining connections between screening for breast, cervical and prostate cancer and colorectal cancer screening.

Author information

1
Cancer Prevention & Control Program, University of South Carolina, 915 Greene Street, Suite 200, Columbia, SC 29208, USA.
2
Cancer Prevention & Control Program, University of South Carolina, 915 Greene Street, Suite 200, Columbia, SC 29208, USA ; Department of Health Promotion, Education, & Behavior, University of South Carolina, 915 Greene Street, Suite 200 Columbia, SC 29208, USA.
3
Department of Health Promotion, Education, & Behavior, University of South Carolina, 915 Greene Street, Suite 200 Columbia, SC 29208, USA ; American Cancer Society, Inc., 128 Stonemark Lane, Columbia, SC, USA.
4
Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, 915 Greene Street, Suite 200, Columbia, SC 29208, USA.
5
Prevention Research Center, University of South Carolina, 921 Assembly Street Room 124, Columbia, SC 29208, USA ; Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 921 Assembly Street Room 124, Columbia, SC 29208 USA.
6
Cancer Prevention & Control Program, University of South Carolina, 915 Greene Street, Suite 200, Columbia, SC 29208, USA ; Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, 915 Greene Street, Suite 200, Columbia, SC 29208, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

To compare participation in breast, cervical and prostate cancer screening with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening.

MATERIALS & METHODS:

This random digit-dialed survey includes participants (aged 50-75 years) from South Carolina (USA). Past participation information in fecal occult blood test, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, mammography, clinical breast examination, Pap test, prostate-specific antigen and digital rectal examination was obtained.Adjusted odds ratios are reported.

RESULTS:

Among European-American women, any cervical or breast cancer screening was associated with adherence to any CRC screening. Among African-American women, mammography was associated with adherence to any CRC screening. Digital rectal examination and prostate-specific antigen tests were associated with adherence to any CRC screening test among all men.

CONCLUSION:

Future research should explore approaches inclusive of cancer screening recommendations for multiple cancer types for reduction of cancer screening disparities.

KEYWORDS:

breast cancer screening; cervical cancer screening; colorectal cancer screening; health disparities; prostate cancer screening

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