Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biol Reprod. 2014 Oct;91(4):90. doi: 10.1095/biolreprod.114.119867. Epub 2014 Aug 20.

The gametic synapse: RNA transfer to the bovine oocyte.

Author information

1
Département des sciences animales, Centre de recherche en biologie de la reproduction, Institut sur la nutrition et les aliments fonctionnels, Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada.
2
Veterinarian Medicine Department, São Paulo University, São Paulo, Brazil.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
4
Département de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Québec, Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada.
5
Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
6
Département des sciences animales, Centre de recherche en biologie de la reproduction, Institut sur la nutrition et les aliments fonctionnels, Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada claude.robert@fsaa.ulaval.ca.

Abstract

Even after several decades of quiescent storage in the ovary, the female germ cell is capable of reinitiating transcription to build the reserves that are essential to support early embryonic development. In the current model of mammalian oogenesis, there exists bilateral communication between the gamete and the surrounding cells that is limited to paracrine signaling and direct transfer of small molecules via gap junctions existing at the end of the somatic cells' projections that are in contact with the oolemma. The purpose of this work was to explore the role of cumulus cell projections as a means of conductance of large molecules, including RNA, to the mammalian oocyte. By studying nascent RNA with confocal and transmission electron microscopy in combination with transcript detection, we show that the somatic cells surrounding the fully grown bovine oocyte contribute to the maternal reserves by actively transferring large cargo, including mRNA and long noncoding RNA. This occurrence was further demonstrated by the reconstruction of cumulus-oocyte complexes with transfected cumulus cells transferring a synthetic transcript. We propose selective transfer of transcripts occurs, the delivery of which is supported by a remarkable synapselike vesicular trafficking connection between the cumulus cells and the gamete. This unexpected exogenous contribution to the maternal stores offers a new perspective on the determinants of female fertility.

KEYWORDS:

in vitro maturation (IVM); intercellular communication; oocyte development; oocyte maturation

PMID:
25143353
DOI:
10.1095/biolreprod.114.119867
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center