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J Virol. 2014 Nov;88(21):12694-702. doi: 10.1128/JVI.01509-14. Epub 2014 Aug 20.

Organization of capsid-associated tegument components in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California, USA The California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California, USA Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California, USA.
2
Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California, USA.
3
The California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California, USA Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California, USA Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California, USA.
4
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California, USA The California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California, USA Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California, USA Hong.Zhou@UCLA.edu.

Abstract

Capsid-associated tegument proteins have been identified in alpha- and betaherpesviruses to play an essential role in viral DNA packaging. Whether and how such tegument proteins exist in gammaherpesviruses have been mysteries. Here, we report a 6-Å-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) virion, a member of the oncogenic gammaherpesvirus subfamily. The KSHV virion structure reveals, for the first time, how capsid-associated tegument proteins are organized in a gammaherpesvirus, with five tegument densities capping each penton vertex, a pattern highly similar to that in alphaherpesvirus but completely different from that in betaherpesvirus. Each KSHV tegument density can be divided into three prominent regions: a penton-binding globular region, a helix-bundle stalk region, and a β-sheet-rich triplex-binding region. Fitting of the crystal structure of the truncated HSV-1 UL25 protein (the KSHV ORF19 homolog) and secondary structure analysis of the full-length ORF19 established that ORF19 constitutes the globular region with an N-terminal, 60-amino-acid-long helix extending into the stalk region. Matching secondary structural features resolved in the cryo-EM density with secondary structures predicted by sequence analysis identifies the triplex-binding region to be ORF32, a homolog of alphaherpesvirus UL17. Despite the high level of tegument structural similarities between KSHV and alphaherpesvirus, an ORF19 monomer in KSHV, in contrast to a UL25 dimer in alphaherpesviruses, binds each penton subunit, an observation that correlates with conformational differences in their pentons. This newly discovered organization of triplex-ORF32-ORF19 also resolves a long-standing mystery surrounding the virion location and conformation of alphaherpesvirus UL25 protein.

IMPORTANCE:

Several capsid-associated tegument proteins have been identified in the alpha- and betaherpesvirus subfamilies of the Herpesviridae. These tegument proteins play essential roles in viral propagation and are potential drug targets for curbing herpesvirus infections. However, no such tegument proteins have been identified for gammaherpesviruses, the third herpesvirus subfamily, which contains members causing several human cancers. Here, by high-resolution cryo-EM, we show the three-dimensional structure of the capsid-associated tegument proteins in the prototypical member of gammaherpesviruses, KSHV. The cryo-EM structure reveals that the organization of KSHV capsid-associated tegument proteins is highly similar to that in alphaherpesvirus but completely different from that in betaherpesvirus. Structural analyses further localize ORF19 and ORF32 proteins (the alphaherpesvirus UL25 and UL17 homologs in KSHV, respectively) in the KSHV capsid-associated tegument cryo-EM structure. These findings also resolve a long-standing mystery regarding the location and conformation of alphaherpesvirus UL25 protein inside the virion.

PMID:
25142590
PMCID:
PMC4248902
DOI:
10.1128/JVI.01509-14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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