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Lancet Neurol. 2014 Sep;13(9):913-23. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(14)70085-7.

Adipokines: a link between obesity and dementia?

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behaviour, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
2
Department of Neurology, State University of New York-Downstate Medical Center, New York, USA; Section for Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Institute for Neuroscience and Physiology, Gothenburg, Sweden; UMS 011 Inserm Versailles Saint Quentin, France. Electronic address: deborah.gustafson@downstate.edu.

Abstract

Being overweight or obese, as measured with body-mass index or central adiposity (waist circumference), and the trajectory of body-mass index over the life course have been associated with brain atrophy, white matter changes, disturbances of blood-brain barrier integrity, and risk of all-cause late-onset dementia and Alzheimer's disease. This observation leads us to question what it is about body-mass index that is associated with health of the brain and dementia risk. If high body-mass index and central adiposity represent an increase in adipose tissue, then the endocrine function of adipose tissue, mediated by adipose tissue hormones and adipokines, could be a clue to mechanisms that underlie the association with dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Hundreds of adipokines have been identified, creating a complexity that is a challenge to simplify. Nonetheless, adipokines are being investigated in association with clinical dementia outcomes, and with imaging-based measures of brain volume, structure, and function in human beings and in preclinical models of clinical dementia.

PMID:
25142458
PMCID:
PMC4228955
DOI:
10.1016/S1474-4422(14)70085-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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