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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 Nov;23(11):2357-65. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0297. Epub 2014 Aug 19.

Association of leukocyte mitochondrial DNA copy number with colorectal cancer risk: Results from the Shanghai Women's Health Study.

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology and Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee. School of Public Health, Guilin Medical University, Guilin, Guangxi, China.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai, China.
3
Division of Epidemiology and Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee.
4
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland.
5
Division of Epidemiology and Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee. qiuyin.cai@vanderbilt.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mitochondria play an important role in cellular energy metabolism, free radical production, and apoptosis, and thus may be involved in cancer development.

METHODS:

We evaluated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral leukocytes in relation to colorectal cancer risk in a case-control study of 444 colorectal cancer cases and 1,423 controls nested in the Shanghai Women's Health Study, a population-based, prospective cohort study. Relative mtDNA copy number was determined by a quantitative real-time PCR assay using peripheral leukocyte DNA samples collected at the time of study enrollment, before cancer diagnosis.

RESULTS:

We found that baseline mtDNA copy number was lower among women who subsequently developed colorectal cancer [geometric mean, 0.277; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.269-0.285] than among women who remained cancer-free (geometric mean, 0.288; 95% CI, 0.284-0.293; P = 0.0153). Multivariate adjusted ORs were 1.26 (95% CI, 0.93-1.70) and 1.44 (95% CI, 1.06-1.94) for the middle and lower tertiles of mtDNA copy number, respectively, compared with the upper tertile (highest mtDNA copy number; Ptrend = 0.0204). The association varied little by the interval between blood collection and cancer diagnosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data suggest that mtDNA copy number measured in peripheral leukocytes may be a potential biomarker useful for colorectal cancer risk assessment.

IMPACT:

If confirmed, mtDNA copy number measured in peripheral leukocytes may be a biomarker useful for colorectal cancer risk assessment.

PMID:
25139937
PMCID:
PMC4221544
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0297
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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