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J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 Feb;70(2):202-9. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glu110. Epub 2014 Aug 18.

Strength and function response to clinical interventions of older women categorized by weakness and low lean mass using classifications from the Foundation for the National Institute of Health sarcopenia project.

Author information

1
University of Central Florida, Orlando.
2
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York.
3
University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington.
4
National Institute of Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
5
California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco.
6
Hebrew Senior Life Institute for Aging Research, Boston, Massachusetts. Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore.
8
Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
9
Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
10
University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington. kenny@uchc.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health Sarcopenia Project developed data-driven cut-points for clinically meaningful weakness and low lean body mass. This analysis describes strength and function response to interventions based on these classifications.

METHODS:

In data from four intervention studies, 378 postmenopausal women with baseline and 6-month data were evaluated for change in grip strength, appendicular lean mass corrected for body mass index, leg strength and power, and short physical performance battery (SPPB). Clinical interventions included hormones, exercise, and nutritional supplementation. Differences in outcomes were evaluated between (i) those with and without weakness and (ii) those with weakness and low lean mass or with one but not the other. We stratified analyses by slowness (walking speed ≤ 0.8 m/s) and by treatment assignment.

RESULTS:

The women (72±7 years; body mass index of 26±5kg/m(2)) were weak (33%), had low lean mass (14%), or both (6%). Those with weakness increased grip strength, lost less leg power, and gained SPPB score (p < .05) compared with nonweak participants. Stratified analyses were similar for grip strength and SPPB. With lean mass in the analysis, individuals with weakness had larger gains in grip strength and SPPB scores regardless of low lean mass (p < .01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Older women with clinically meaningful muscle weakness increased grip strength and SPPB, regardless of the presence of low lean mass following treatment with interventions for frailty. Thus, results suggest that muscle weakness, as defined by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health Sarcopenia Project, appears to be a treatable symptom.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical trials.; Function; Gait speed; Sarcopenia; Strength

PMID:
25135999
PMCID:
PMC4311186
DOI:
10.1093/gerona/glu110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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