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Occup Med (Lond). 2014 Oct;64(7):497-502. doi: 10.1093/occmed/kqu099. Epub 2014 Aug 18.

A survey of sitting time among UK employees.

Author information

1
NIHR Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit, Leicester Diabetes Centre, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester LE5 4PW, UK, Aadil.Kazi@uhl-tr.nhs.uk.
2
Centre for Applied Resilience in Healthcare, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London SE1 8WA, UK.
3
Work and Health Research Centre, School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sedentary behaviour is a known risk factor for a wide range of chronic diseases. This major health risk is likely to increase given the increasingly sedentary nature of work.

AIMS:

To investigate the prevalence of sedentary behaviour in a sample of UK working-aged adults, across a range of employment sectors.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional survey conducted with organizations throughout the UK in the education, government administration, retail, telecommunications and service industry sectors. The questionnaire examined employee and organizational information, self-reported domain-specific sitting time, sleep and physical activity.

RESULTS:

A total of 1141 employees completed the questionnaire, of which 504 completed all aspects of the Domain-Specific Sitting Time Questionnaire for work day sitting. Work time sitting accounted for more than half of the total daily sitting time on a work day (54%). Significantly more time was reported sitting on a work day than time reported sleeping (P < 0.001). Males spent more time sitting at work and using a personal computer at home compared with females. Workers in the telecommunications industry had the highest sitting times. There were significant positive associations between sitting time and body mass index.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is a pressing need for future workplace health interventions to reduce employee sitting times.

KEYWORDS:

Healthy lifestyles; health workplaces; occupational health services; physical activity; sedentary behavior; workplace health promotion.

PMID:
25135938
DOI:
10.1093/occmed/kqu099
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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