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J Vasc Surg. 2015 Feb;61(2):469-74. doi: 10.1016/j.jvs.2014.07.008. Epub 2014 Aug 15.

Computed tomography-guided reoperation for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

Author information

1
Section of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colo. Electronic address: joshua.greenberg@ucdenver.edu.
2
Section of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colo.
3
Presbyterian/St. Luke's Medical Center, Denver, Colo; Diversified Radiology of Colorado, Lakewood, Colo.
4
Section of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colo; Presbyterian/St. Luke's Medical Center, Denver, Colo.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Persistent or recurrent symptoms after surgical treatment for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (nTOS) is a problem commonly encountered by high-volume referral centers. The mechanical etiology patterns at reoperation include (1) inadequate previous rib resection, (2) rib regrowth, (3) scar tissue formation, or (4) intact scalene muscle. Reoperative TOS surgery has significant potential morbidity, and therefore, careful patient selection and meticulous planning are required. This study evaluated the utility of multidetector computed tomography (CT) in the differential diagnosis of patients with recurrent or persistent nTOS.

METHODS:

A retrospective record review was performed of a nTOS referral practice of patients treated from 2003 to 2012 to focus on patients reoperated on for recurrent or persistent symptoms. In 2003, a dedicated high-resolution multidetector TOS CT protocol was established to assist in clinical decision making and reoperative planning. A single designated radiologist interpreted all CT images. Imaging, patient clinical characteristics, interventions, and outcomes were reviewed.

RESULTS:

The study group included 20 reoperations for recurrent (n = 15) or persistent (n = 5) symptoms. Mean age was 35 years, and 60% of redo cases were in women. Preoperative CT imaging demonstrated the following anatomic patterns: inadequate previous rib resection in 5 (25%), rib regrowth in 5 (25%), scar tissue formation in 10 (50%), and intact scalene muscle in 3 (15%). Operative findings concurred with preoperative imaging in 85% of patients. There were no neurovascular injuries and no major complications. At a mean follow-up of 43 months, improvement or resolution of symptoms was significant in nine patients (45%), moderate in seven (35%), and minimal in four (20%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Recurrent/persistent nTOS is an often-vexing problem with challenging solutions. These results demonstrate the utility of a TOS protocol CT scan in providing correlative objective findings and in assisting with reoperative planning. Positive radiographic findings that correlate with patient symptoms inform the decision to reoperate.

PMID:
25135877
DOI:
10.1016/j.jvs.2014.07.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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