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Trends Neurosci. 2014 Oct;37(10):539-50. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2014.07.004. Epub 2014 Aug 14.

Control of neural circuit formation by leucine-rich repeat proteins.

Author information

1
VIB Center for the Biology of Disease, 3000 Leuven, Belgium; KU Leuven, Center for Human Genetics, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: joris.dewit@cme.vib-kuleuven.be.
2
Neuroscience Discovery, F. Hoffman-La Roche, 4070 Basel, Switzerland.

Abstract

The function of neural circuits depends on the precise connectivity between populations of neurons. Increasing evidence indicates that disruptions in excitatory or inhibitory synapse formation or function lead to excitation/inhibition (E/I) imbalances and contribute to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing surface proteins have emerged as key organizers of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Distinct LRR proteins are expressed in different cell types and interact with key pre- and postsynaptic proteins. These protein interaction networks allow LRR proteins to coordinate pre- and postsynaptic elements during synapse formation and differentiation, pathway-specific synapse development, and synaptic plasticity. LRR proteins, therefore, play a critical role in organizing synaptic connections into functional neural circuits, and their dysfunction may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders.

KEYWORDS:

connectivity; excitation/inhibition balance; glutamate receptor; synaptic adhesion; synaptic transmission; synaptogenesis

PMID:
25131359
PMCID:
PMC4189993
DOI:
10.1016/j.tins.2014.07.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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